What we can do from the inside

Guests in The Sustainable Hour no 313 on 13 May 2020 are economist Jim Crosthwaite who talks about the economics of gas, and Janet Massey who talks about her electric car.

We play excerpts from two of the many speakers at the Stimulus Summit, which gathered 3,500 Australians in Zoom on 6 May: John Grimes, CEO of Smart Energy Council, and Tim Washington, Chair of Electric Vehicle Council.


Peri Wise Women say “NO” to gas

Today we start with our Jackie Matthews excitedly telling us about two projects that she’s been involved in over the last week:
1) Her first podcast aimed at women her age, Peri Wise Women
2) The 10-week Nature Stewards course that she has just started as a participant.
We’ll be hearing a lot more about both of these

In his Global Outlook Colin Mockett looks at two items:
1) The impact of Corona-19 on public transport in the United Kingdom. Social distancing doesn’t allow for public transport. Consequently councils there are being encouraged to put more emphasis on cycling and walking facilities as this pandemic releases its grip on us.
2) The impact that share holder activists are having on fossil fuel companies. Colin cites the decisions recently made at Woodside Petroleum’s teleconference AGM setting targets for them to go zero carbon.

Our first guest of the hour is Jim Crosthwaite who is an agricultural economist. He tells us about his investigation into the economics of the ‘natural gas’ industry. This is the energy source that some people see as the transition fuel as we move away from coal. Jim refutes this and clearly explains his reasons for this conclusion.

Following Jim comes Geelong local sustainability activist Janet Massey. Janet relates the story of her six year process to convert her petrol driven car into one powered by electricity, strongly supported by the Geelong Electric Vehicle Club.

We hope you enjoy the show as much as we did in putting it together.

Until next week: Be the difference!


“There’s a new type of climate activism, where people are buying the shares of big companies and influencing decisions at their Annual General Meetings, working from the inside.”
~ Colin Mockett, in The Sustainable Hour no 313


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Acknowledgement

We at The Sustainable Hour would like to pay our respect to the traditional custodians of the land on which we are broadcasting, the Wathaurong People, and pay our respect to their elders, past, present and future.

The traditional owners lived in harmony with the land. They nurtured it and thrived in often harsh conditions for millenia before they were invaded. Their land was then stolen from them – it wasn’t ceeded. It is becoming more and more obvious that, if we are to survive the climate emergency we are facing, we have much to learn from their land management practices.

Our battle for climate justice won’t be won until our First Nations brothers and sisters have their true justice. When we talk about the future, it means extending our respect to those children not yet born, the generations of the future – remembering the old saying that…

“We do not inherit the Earth from our ancestors. We borrow it from our children.”

The decisions currently being made around Australia to ignore climate change are being made by those who won’t be around by the time the worst effects hit home. How utterly disgusting, disrespectful and unfair is that?



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→ The Guardian – 9 May 2020:
UK plans £250m boost for cycle lanes and fast-track e-scooter trials
“Campaigners call for redesign of transport system to help prevent bounce-back in air pollution.”



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WEBINAR:

So you’re thinking of buying an electric car?

Renew’s zoominar “So you’re thinking of buying an electric car” with Bryce Gaton and David Cann is available on Renew’s Youtube channel: Click here to view the presentation and please share the link with anyone you think would find it helpful.

You can also view the presentation slides from the links here.

Links mentioned during the zoominar:

About the speakers:

David Cann is a member of the Adelaide Electric Vehicle Association (AEVA) and a founder of the Nissan LEAF Owners Australia and the Hyundai Ioniq and Kona Enthusiasts Facebook groups.

David has owned three EVs and will describe his experiences which began with a second hand Nissan LEAF. He’s done a few long trips including Darwin to Adelaide to Sydney to Cradle Mountain and will explain why range anxiety has never been a concern. He will tell his story and of his experiences as an EV owner. He purchased a Nissan LEAF in 2015 as a spare car and shopping runabout. He didn’t think for a minute that it would became the only car he and his wife would use for the next 4 years. They actually never used their late model petrol cars again. His story has convinced others to go all electric and he loves busting myths and tackling common questions. In his presentation, David touches on the subjects of selecting a car to match your lifestyle, ownership, servicing (or lack of it), long distance travel and why you probably don’t need a fast charger at home.

Bryce Gaton is editor of the AEVA newsletter and a writer for RenewEconomy and The Driven  specialising in electric vehicles. He is also a regular contributor to Renew magazine and you can find his fact sheets on available EVs here.

Bryce gives an overview of useful terminology and EV technology and covers what’s currently available in the EV market, those planned in the near future and will compare their features.

If you would like information of joining Renew as a member you can find that here.



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False solutions to climate change

“A veritable cornucopia of false solutions is being pushed these days, not only by corporations and think tanks but by the UN’s IPCC, the international body responsible for research and action on climate. We could have made a gentle transition if we had begun when we first became aware of this problem decades ago, but for various reasons we did not. There is no time left for barking up one wrong tree after another; no time to waste in false solutions. Hence this series pointing out the fallacies behind such proposals as electrifying everything, carbon trading, geoengineering or switching to “gas—the clean energy fuel!”
I’ve divided the issue into sectors: electricity generation, transportation, agriculture, buildings, and then there are two sections on false solutions that aren’t part of an energy sector—geoengineering schemes, and some other policy options.
Finally, we look at real solutions. I am not an expert on anything except maybe gardening, so my hope is to spur discussion.

Part 2: Transportation
In the US, transportation is said to be the largest source of greenhouse gas emissions. The most common solution put forth is a false one: “we’ll electrify all our cars, maybe our trucks too.” Planes and ships are usually not proposed for replacement by electric versions, but trains are. So what’s wrong with this idea?”

→ Resilience – 5 May 2020:
False Solutions to Climate Change: Transportation



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Watch the Stimulus Summit presentations

The ‘Stimulus Summit: A Renewables-led Economic Recovery’ held on 6 May 2020 was a huge success, attracting over 3,500 delegates from across Australia and internationally.

The organisers, Smart Energy Council, recorded all the sessions and you can find them here.

You’ll also find their Powerpoint presentations, as well as links to organisations supporting a renewables-led recovery.

Share the link with your networks. Together we can restart our economy while pushing down emissions at the same time. Everyone working together for a strong economy and a safe future.

Following the successful Ministerial Session at the Stimulus Summit, the Smart Energy Council has written to all State and Federal Energy Ministers, inviting them to participate in an online Energy Ministers’ Summit from 12.00pm-2.00pm AEST on 5 August 2020.

Speaker presentations and segmented videos

www.smartenergy.org.au/renewablesled-economic-recovery

Further resources



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Fiona Armstrong spoke to ABC Weekend Breakfast about pandemics, climate change and health, the fossil fuel industry, and why nature matters.



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Can your money help save the planet?

Renew magazine webinar

When: 20 May, 2020, 12:30 PM AEST (Melbourne time). You will be able to ‘check in’ from 12:20pm.

Where: ONLINE. This is an online webinar using Zoom. If you haven’t used Zoom before, we recommend using this link to test your setup. You will need to register below to get the link to join the meeting.

Tickets: You will receive the necessary web link for the webinar from the ticketing system. We have a capacity of 500 people. Renew depends on the generosity of our community to continue its valuable work. We would welcome your donation here: renew.org.au/donate or via the additional donation option when choosing your ticket.

Click HERE to get a ticket for the webinar

Webinar: Ethical investing is booming. But there are important questions potential investors should ask before jumping aboard. How do you know what companies your super invests in? Is it better to keep stock in problematic companies or divest from them? How can shareholders influence companies’ actions? In this webinar based on our article in Renew 151, you’ll learn about how to use your investments for good. 

Panelists:
Will van de Pol –  Legal Researcher and Campaigner, Market Forces

Market Forces’ work exposes the institutions that are financing environmentally destructive projects and helps Australians hold these institutions accountable. They work with the community to prevent investment in projects that would harm the environment and drive global warming.

Will is the asset management campaigner at Market Forces. Will works with super fund members and shareholders to hold companies and financial institutions to account over their environmental impacts, and shift finance and investment away from fossil fuels.

Dan Gocher – Director of Climate and Environment, Australasian Centre for Corporate Responsibility (ACCR)

The Australasian Centre for Corporate Responsibility (ACCR) is a research and shareholder advocacy organisation. Their focus is on corporate Australia — how listed companies, industry associations and investors are managing climate, labour, human rights and governance issues.

ACCR’s climate program aims to accelerate Australia’s transition to a low carbon economy in line with the Paris Agreement. They engage with ASX-listed companies on their climate risk disclosure and the need to set emissions reduction targets consistent with the Paris Agreement, and also push for reviews by ASX-listed companies of their industry associations’ climate policy advocacy.

Dan spent fifteen years in investment banking and asset management. More recently, he was the asset management campaigner at the environmental NGO Market Forces. Dan holds a Bachelor of Commerce from the University of Sydney.

Renew: technology for a sustainable future is Australia’s premier magazine on practical sustainable living. Published quarterly, Renew features the latest in sustainable building practice and renewable energy technology. 

The current issue, Renew 151, is our energy transition special. It features an article by Tim Forcey about the end of Bass Strait gas, and a feature from Renew Energy Analyst Andrew Reddaway on what’s needed to scale up our energy transition. The issue also includes our newest efficient hot water buyers guide and an e-bike guide.

Read more about it, and get your copy now or become a Renew member to receive the magazine regularly. 

→ Source: Newsletter from Renew




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10 key mega renewables projects and ideas to lead Covid-19 recovery
Read more on www.reneweconomy.com.au/?p=145907



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Events we have talked about in The Sustainable Hour

Events in Victoria

The following is a collation of Victorian climate change events, activities, seminars, exhibitions, meetings and protests. Most are free, many ask for RSVP (which lets the organising group know how many to expect), some ask for donations to cover expenses, and a few require registration and fees. This calendar is provided as a free service by volunteers of the Victorian Climate Action Network. Information is as accurate as possible, but changes may occur.

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Podcasts and posts on this website about climate emergency
Latest news on BBC about climate change


Live-streaming on pause

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The Sustainable Hour is normally streamed live on the Internet every Wednesday from 11am to 12pm (Melbourne time), but due to the corona lockdown, the radio station has been closed.

» To listen to the program on your computer or phone, click here – or go to www.947thepulse.com where you then click on ‘Listen Live’ on the right.

Podcast archive

Over 300 hours of sustainable podcasts

Listen to all of The Sustainable Hour radio shows in full length:

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