THE REGENERATIVE HOUR: Preparing to go red or blue

In The Regenerative Hour no 5 Mik talks with Melbourne-based climate emergency campaigner Adrian Whitehead about the participant-run gathering ‘Red and Blue‘, which focuses on “establishing thriving, sustainable communities and food growing systems to prepare for a range of future scenarios we may face in the next 50 years”.

The event runs from Friday evening 29 November to Sunday 1 December 2019 at Yarra Valley ECOSS, 711 Old Warburton Road in Wesburn, Victoria.

The ‘Red and Blue’ gathering in Victoria focuses on two major themes: a social decline theme such as might be caused by peak oil, early stage global warming, or economic collapse – Blue – and a severe collapse theme and scenarios such as late stage global warming or global nuclear war – Red.

The name of the event was inspired by the Future Scenario work of David Holmgren.

The gathering will host a range of workshops, discussions and events focused on the background, skills, technology, systems and cultural issues surrounding preparation for these scenarios.

The weekend will also “do a little bit of Green“, discussing options for saving the future.

The event will be largely self-organised with participants expected to contribute both financially and by volunteering their time either teaching, undertaking supporting roles, or supporting the host site by joining any of the blitzs during the event.

→ Read more on www.redandbluegatherings.net

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This podcast also contains

Youtube videos:
David Suzuki Foundation: One Nature
Michael C. Hall’s call to action
• An excerpt of Jeremy Rifkin’s talk about biosphere consciousness in The Third Industrial Revolution: A Radical New Sharing Economy
• The Juice Media’s Honest Government Ad | We’re F**ked

Music:
Billie Eilish: ‘All The Good Girls Go To Hell’ and
Dub FX: ‘Theory Of Harmony – Intro’


Enhancing the potential survival

“The more I read and the more I think about the current climate disaster, the more I think that it’s too late to stop reaching catastrophic temperatures.
As a result I have to wonder if I wouldn’t be better off to put more energy into enhancing the potential survival of myself and others.
The Heat Refuges [project] we’ve started working on is a good start but we need to do more; there are severe water and food shortages coming and our ‘leaders’ are too blind, stubborn, stupid or politically driven to realise let alone help so it’s up to the community
I don’t mean hoarding food or water, I mean doing this on a community level.
Put your thinking caps on and see if we can come up with anything.”

Ron Fletcher – in a comment in Extinction Rebellion Geelong’s Facebook group



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Photo by Kristi McCluer

“Climate apocalypse, by contrast, is messy.”

“The goal has been clear for thirty years, and despite earnest efforts we’ve made essentially no progress toward reaching it. Today, the scientific evidence verges on irrefutable. If you’re younger than sixty, you have a good chance of witnessing the radical destabilization of life on earth—massive crop failures, apocalyptic fires, imploding economies, epic flooding, hundreds of millions of refugees fleeing regions made uninhabitable by extreme heat or permanent drought. If you’re under thirty, you’re all but guaranteed to witness it.”

“Psychologically, this denial makes sense. Despite the outrageous fact that I’ll soon be dead forever, I live in the present, not the future. Given a choice between an alarming abstraction (death) and the reassuring evidence of my senses (breakfast!), my mind prefers to focus on the latter. The planet, too, is still marvelously intact, still basically normal—seasons changing, another election year coming, new comedies on Netflix—and its impending collapse is even harder to wrap my mind around than death.

Other kinds of apocalypse, whether religious or thermonuclear or asteroidal, at least have the binary neatness of dying: one moment the world is there, the next moment it’s gone forever. Climate apocalypse, by contrast, is messy. It will take the form of increasingly severe crises compounding chaotically until civilization begins to fray. Things will get very bad, but maybe not too soon, and maybe not for everyone. Maybe not for me.”

“There may come a time, sooner than any of us likes to think, when the systems of industrial agriculture and global trade break down and homeless people outnumber people with homes. At that point, traditional local farming and strong communities will no longer just be liberal buzzwords. Kindness to neighbors and respect for the land—nurturing healthy soil, wisely managing water, caring for pollinators—will be essential in a crisis and in whatever society survives it.”
~ Jonathan Franzen

→ The New Yorker – 8 September 2019:
“What If We Stopped Pretending? The climate apocalypse is coming. To prepare for it, we need to admit that we can’t prevent it.”



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“As the climate collapses, we can either stand together – or perish alone”

“Collective action is our only hope for enduring climate breakdown. Calls for survivalism will only hasten catastrophe.
If we’re to survive in the far-less-hospitable world that two centuries of institutionalised greed, selfishness and short-sightedness have bequeathed us, it will only be together. It will only be by using the coming years to cultivate resilient, cohesive, cooperative, equitable communities, embedded in the natural world.”
~ Tim Hollo

Interconnected ecological democracy

Seminar by Tim Hollo: Towards Ecological Democracy – a political theory for the 21st century



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Humanity needs to prepare for disruptive impacts

Since professor Jem Bendell‘s paper ‘Deep Adaptation’ was released at the end of July 2018, there have been many alarming reports about environmental change and its implications for humanity. These reports, from the world’s leading scientists and international organisations, provide extra weight to the argument that humanity needs to prepare for disruptive impacts as well as seeking to curb them.

Bendell has prepared a compendium which summarises some of the more significant studies. The compendium is divided into four sections: The first is on our changing climate, the second is on related environmental changes, the third is on societal impacts, and the fourth is on the significance of our response.

Read more

→ Connect with the Deep Adaptation network on www.deepadaptation.ning.com

Professor Jem Bendell gave this talk at Buddhafields’ Green Earth Awakening event in the UK in September 2019, where he reflected on some spiritual aspects of Deep Adaptation.

Read more reflections from professor Bendell on the spiritual aspects of the climate emergency at www.jembendell.com

Australian Facebook group: Positive Deep Adoptation

The Facebook group ‘Positive Deep Adaptation Oceania’ is part of a global Deep Adaptation group network.

“The group is committed to raising awareness of our climate predicament and fostering dialogue on its psychological and spiritual implications. We encourage social action and creation of means to support individual and collective wellbeing ahead of (and during) social breakdown.

Our core values are compassion, curiosity and respect and to return to those values whenever we stray from them.”

→ Private group on Facebook: Positive Deep Adaptation Oceania – Australia, Indonesia, New Zealand etc

→ To find out more about Deep Adaptation, you can download Jem Bendell’s original ‘Deep Adaptation’ paper on www.lifeworth.com/deepadaptation.pdf

Recommended reading

In their October newsletter, Lifeworth in United Kingdom recommended the following three books to the members of the Deep Adaptation Groups Network:

After Progress by John Michael Greer
considers how more than two hundred years of energy abundance has meant that the notion of progress is now deep in the collective unconscious. Assuming progress is our natural destiny of progress means that we don’t imagine our society could end; we dismiss even existential threats as mere obstacles and cannot see decline for what it is, or prepare for it.

Questioning Collapse by Patricia A. McAnany and Norman Yoffee (eds).
Writing largely in response to Jared Diamond’s popular book on collapse, this collection of essays comprehensively refutes most of Diamond’s case studies arguing that collapse is a poor framing for those historical events and further that by characterising them that way, we miss the real lessons of resilience of adaptation.

Who Do We Choose to Be? by Margaret Wheatley.
Having accepted that decline and collapse is inevitable, Wheatley doesn’t wish to spend her time and leadership skills lobbying the political and financial elites. This thoughtful book is about leadership and making a difference at the local level where action is still possible.


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Acknowledgement

We at The Sustainable Hour would like to pay our respect to the traditional custodians of the land on which we are broadcasting, the Wathaurong People, and pay our respect to their elders, past, present and future.

The traditional owners lived in harmony with the environment and with the climate for hundreds of generations. It is not clear – yet – that as European settlers we have demonstrated that we can live in harmony for hundreds of generations, but it is clear that we can learn from the indigenous, traditional owners of this land.

When we talk about the future, it means extending our respect to those children not yet born, the generations of the future – remembering the old saying that…

The decisions currently being made around Australia to ignore climate change are being made by those who won’t be around by the time the worst effects hit home. How utterly disgusting, disrespectful and unfair is that?


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“The most important word in today’s world is ‘together’.”
~ Jan Eliasson, UN Deputy Secretary-General

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