Do it for Bub


Guests in The Sustainable Hour on 16 January 2019 are:

Maxine Bazeley is in the early stages of labour – with contractions every 10 minutes as we speak on the phone. Her dedication to reducing waste is not stopping her from sharing valuable tips to our listeners. She explains how she has nested sustainably in preparation for her first baby. As the Marie Kondo revolution transpires through social media, Maxine is at the forefront of this phenomenon by not being an over-consumer. At 40 weeks and four days pregnant… yep: Maxine has not bought one thing brand new for her new bub. Her home only has second hand goods.
The whole thing with the ‘Kondo clean out’ is that people over-consume in the first place. Are all these people who are cleaning out then not going to over-purchase again? – or will they have to be kondo-cleaning out again in 12 months time? Something for our listeners to think about.

Hadassah Djordan talks mindful consumption, sustainable fashion and ethical clothing with our roving reporter Lene Foghsgaard – the seventh segment of her series, ‘Sustainable People’. Hadassah Jordan owns the store ‘Frankie’s Story’ in South Melbourne Market which sells clothing and accessories for both children and adults that is both ethical and ecological. The store is named after Hadassah Jordans daughter, Frankie. It all started with her. The vision and wish to provide mindful clothing for children

Helen McCosker, co-organiser of National Regenerative Agriculture Day which is on 14 February 2019, St Valentine’s Day. Helen and her husband Mike are farmers in New South Wales. They are passionate about soil and soil health, and they embrace regenerative agriculture to achieve this.
Back in 2015, they organised community concerts to assist with the wellbeing of people in country areas. Now they have set up a charity, ‘What would love do’. The aim of this charity is to provide longer-term solutions to drought-torn rural communities. On Valentine’s Day they are reaching out to the nation and making people more aware of where their food comes from.

Lauren, Anissa and Bec – three young Front Line Action on Coal (FLAC) activists, interviewed immediately after they had run a very successful day of non-violent direct action training with around 40 participants in Melbourne in December 2018. They talk about why they do such training, how they feel the training day went, and why they think non-violent direct action is important in affecting change.

“Participation – that’s what’s gonna save the human race.”
~ Pete Seeger, American singer



Listen to The Sustainable Hour no. 249 on 94.7 The Pulse:

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www.facebook.com/frankiesstory


 LISTENER SERVICE: 

In other news

From our notes of this week: news stories and events we didn’t mention but which we think you should know about


Regenerative farming removing CO2

“…My next light bulb moment came reading ‘The Soil Will Save Us’ by Kristin Ohlson. 17 pages in I was stunned by this statement:

“[with] good land management practices…[enough] carbon can be sequestered annually in the world’s soils [to] reduc[e] the concentration of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by 3 ppm [parts per million] every year.”

Reduce the concentration of CO2? With land management practices that are available now? I had never heard anyone talk about removing atmospheric CO2 before. By my math, lowering atmospheric CO2 by 3 ppm/year would get us back to pre-industrial levels in a little over 30 years. But how much land would it take? Ohlson answers (p. 233):

“The rates of biomass production we are currently observing…have the capability to capture enough CO2… to offset all anthropogenic CO2 emissions on less than 11 percent of world cropland. Over twice this amount of land is fallow at any time worldwide.”

For the first time, I felt hope that it might be possible for climate disaster to be averted.”

» Medium | Healthy Climate Alliance – 7 December 2018:
My “Maybe we’re not doomed!” light bulb moment(s)



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City Of Melbourne (Council) Now 100% Renewable Electricity Powered

Stop telling us it can’t be done. Melbourne just did it.




Australia’s “hottest days ever”

Special Climate Statement 68 — widespread heatwaves during December 2018 and January 2019

Published by the Bureau of Meteorology

“An unusual extended period of heatwaves over much of Australia began in early December 2018 and continued into January 2019. The Australian mean daily maximum temperature on 27 December 2018 was the highest on record for December, and the second-highest for any month. Numerous locations reported their highest December or January daily maximum temperature on record, with some locations exceeding their previous records by large margins. Overall, it was Australia’s warmest December on record.
These widespread heatwaves during December and January followed an extreme heatwave that affected the tropical Queensland coast during late November as the heatwave conditions began an anticlockwise loop around the country.
Rainfall was below average over the Pilbara and Kimberley region of Western Australia for several months towards the end of 2018. Into December, the region had seen little thunderstorm activity and no monsoonal activity, and thus little cloud or moisture influencing the weather. With the summer solstice occurring on 22 December, the sun during this period was almost directly overhead, providing the maximum amount of solar radiation. Weather patterns over northern Australia tended to be static, with heat lows persisting and no significant synoptic systems to change the air mass. This provided near-ideal conditions for heat build-up.
The progression of troughs and other weather systems from west to east across Australia, and northwesterly winds ahead of the troughs, dragged the hot air east and south periodically over the Northern Territory, South Australia, western Queensland, New South Wales, and Victoria.
While all exceptional climate events have proximate causes in antecedent and concurrent weather conditions, long-term trends also play a role. Australia’s annual mean temperature has warmed by just over 1°C since 1910, and summer has warmed by a similar amount. Australia’s annual warming trend is consistent with that observed for the globe.”

» Download report


https://twitter.com/BOM_au/status/1083489190061461504

» The New Daily – 16 January 2019:
Heatwave pushes temperatures to 50C as Australia gets hottest days ever



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Acknowledgement

We at The Sustainable Hour would like to pay our respect to the traditional custodians of the land on which we are broadcasting, the Wathaurong People, and pay our respect to their elders, past, present and future.

The traditional owners lived in harmony with the environment and with the climate for hundreds of generations. It is not clear – yet – that as European settlers we have demonstrated that we can live in harmony for hundreds of generations, but it is clear that we can learn from the indigenous, traditional owners of this land.

When we talk about the future, it means extending our respect to those children not yet born, the generations of the future – remembering the old saying that…

The decisions currently being made around Australia to ignore climate change are being made by those who won’t be around by the time the worst effects hit home. How utterly disgusting, disrespectful and unfair is that?


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» Download podcast audio: https://climatesafety.info/wp-content/uploads/2019/01/sustainablehour249_032kbp.mp3 » Listen online and find more info: https://climatesafety.info/thesustainablehour249/ The Sustainable Hour on 19 January 2019: DO IT FOR BUB Guests in The Sustainable Hour no 249 are: • Maxine Bazeley, Teal Collaborative • Hadassah Djordan, Frankie’s Story • Helen McCosker, National Regenerative Agriculture Day • Lauren Mueller, Anissa Rogers and Bec Adams, Front Line Action on Coal . . . • Maxine Bazeley is in the early stages of labour – with contractions every 10 minutes as we speak on the phone. Her dedication to reducing waste is not stopping her from sharing valuable tips to our listeners. She explains how she has nested sustainably in preparation for her first baby. As the Marie Kondo revolution transpires through social media, Maxine is at the forefront of this phenomenon by not being an over-consumer. At 40 weeks and four days pregnant… yep: Maxine has not bought one thing brand new for her new bub. Her home only has second hand goods. The whole thing with the ‘Kondo clean out’ is that people over-consume in the first place. Are all these people who are cleaning out then not going to over-purchase again? – or will they have to be kondo-cleaning out again in 12 months time? Something for our listeners to think about. • Hadassah Djordan talks mindful consumption, sustainable fashion and ethical clothing with our roving reporter Lene Foghsgaard – the seventh segment of her series, ‘Sustainable People’. Hadassah Jordan owns the store ‘Frankie’s Story’ in South Melbourne Market which sells clothing and accessories for both children and adults that is both ethical and ecological. The store is named after Hadassah Jordans daughter, Frankie. It all started with her. The vision and wish to provide mindful clothing for children • Helen McCosker, co-organiser of National Regenerative Agriculture Day which is on 14 February 2019, St Valentine’s Day. Helen and her husband Mike are farmers in New South Wales. They are passionate about soil and soil health, and they embrace regenerative agriculture to achieve this. Back in 2015, they organised comm

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“Participation – that’s what’s gonna save the human race.”
~ Pete Seeger, American singer