From Paris to Geelong: we have to change

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In one week, on 4 November 2016, the Paris Agreement will go into effect. The world’s first universally adopted global climate agreement, uniting countries everywhere in fighting climate change. Australia hasn’t ratified the Agreement, which is symbolic of the cowardice position its government takes on the issue.

Below is a compilation of recent news about the problem, and the solutions. Whether Australians realise it or not, the world is changing quickly – and as individuals we need to get involved, learn about the issues and the solutions which are at hand, mobilise our communities, and get ready, from Paris to Geelong, because there are no more excuses: we have to change. Now. Like in: next week. Not: next decade.

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The emission pledges from the US, EU, China, and India leave no room for other countries to emit in a 2°C emission budget (with a 66 per cent chance of success). » Source: Global Carbon Project



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“We have a climate emergency, but no one is reporting the facts. Politicians will not lead with action until the public is aware, accepts the truth, and demands urgent action. Help get the climate truth reported properly – sign this petition.”
David Anthony Hood

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“Although the magnitude of climate change may make individuals feel helpless, individual action is critical for meaningful change.”
Mia Armstrong


» The State Press – 27 October 2016:
Global climate change: Taking action is not optional



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Watch Leonardo DiCaprio’s climate change documentary online for free

The Fisher Stevens-directed documentary will make its television debut on National Geographic’s channel in 171 countries and 45 languages on Sunday 30 October 2016.

Additionally, in an unprecedented move, National Geographic also announced today that Before the Flood will premiere commercial free across digital and streaming platforms around the world as part of the network’s commitment to covering climate change.

That means not only can you catch the critically acclaimed film on cable, from 30 October through 6 November 2016, you can also watch it on just about any website or device where you regularly stream online videos.

The exhaustive list includes: Natgeotv.com, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter, Amazon, iTunes, Netflix, Hulu, Sony PlayStation, GooglePlay, VOD/Video On Demand (through MVPD set-top boxes), MVPD Sites and Apps, Nat Geo TV Apps (iPhone, iPad and Apple TV, Roku, Android phones, Xbox One and 360, Samsung Connected TVs) and more. » www.beforetheflood.com/screenings

Click on image to see the full infographic
Click on image to see the full infographic

» Infographic: www.greenmatch.co.uk



Leonardo DiCaprio has direct access to talk with world leaders. After spending years looking into the issue he concludes that we can’t keep waiting around in the hope that our leaders will do what needs to get done, because they won’t. This problem will HAVE to be solved by us, the people. You and me. 


Leonardo sums it up this way:
Consume differently 
- what you buy
 – what you eat
 – how you get your power
… and vote for leaders who will fight climate change


“There is no more important story to tell, no more important issue facing our planet than that of climate change.”
~ Leonardo DiCaprio


» Watch the full documentary here:
www.beforetheflood.nationalgeographic.com.au


The idea behind this historic premiere is to educate as many people around the world about climate change and to also bring the topic to the forefront before the American 8 November election where a number of candidates seeking public office — including a certain orange-hued Republican — denies that climate change is even real.

“There is no greater threat to the future of our society than climate change, and it must be a top issue for voters this election season,” said DiCaprio, an Oscar-winning actor-winning actor and prominent environmental activist. “Fisher and I set out to make a film to educate people around the planet on the urgent issues of climate change and to inspire them to be part of the solution. I applaud National Geographic for their commitment to bringing this film to as many people as possible at such a critical time.”

» Source: www.ecowatch.com

“It’s gone beyond, as we talk about in the film, simple, individual actions. We need to use our vote…We cannot afford to have political leaders out there that do not believe in modern science, or the scientific method, or empirical truths…We cannot afford to waste time having people in power that choose to believe in the 2% of the scientific community that is basically bought off by lobbyists and oil companies. They are living in the stone ages. They are living in the dark ages. We need to live in the future.”
~ Leonardo DiCaprio – introducing the film at its European premiere

The Oscar-winning actor and environmentalist has spent the past three years asking a wide variety of people around the world about climate change. His collection of interviews in the film – ranging from Barack Obama and the Pope through to Elon Musk and Piers Sellars – cover the science, impacts, vested interests, politics and possible solutions.

“I encourage everyone to see this beautiful but horrifying film about the current state of climate change plaguing this world. It is both pessimistic and hopeful to seek change for a future we would like to exist in, share with our family and children. This is the most important issue facing our lives at this moment.”
~ Joseph Chico


Leonardo Dicaprio and Fisher Stevens discuss the making of ‘Before the Flood’:




Desmogblog suggests: Four ways to promote ‘Before the Flood’
1) Organise a screening party! Invite your friends and neighbours to watch and discuss the film.

2) Tweet/Facebook/Insta about ‘Before The Flood’!
Take two minutes and send some messages. Retweet

3) Check out the film’s website BeforeTheFlood.com: Learn a ton more about the production, check out behind the scenes footage, as well as take action to fight climate change in your area.

4) Share other coverage and encourage everyone to check out the sneak-peeks before the big premiere
» Review and more videos:
7 key scenes in Leonardo DiCaprio’s climate film Before the Flood

“A film about Climate Change that within the first two days of its release was viewed 3.5 million times, is surely one to welcome. Sadly the film would have us believe that we can have our cake and eat it. We can’t. Missing is the kind of inner journey the lifestyles of the rich and famous need to go on for a more equitable, just, and sustainable world. DiCaprio’s reluctance to share his own honest, painful, rich journey with us is such a pity.”

“This is a powerful, timely, and beautifully made film, and it will have a big impact. But it could have been so much more, gone so much deeper, taken so many more risks, been braver. Climate change demands us to take risks, to reimagine sacrifice as opportunity. But if we avoid the sacrifice bit, we skirt around the heart of the issue, and around our own hearts too.”
~ Rob Hopkins, Transition Network


» National Geographic’s theme page with many links and videos:
www.nationalgeographic.com.au/tv/before-the-flood

» Much more info and suggestions on Desmogblog:
Before the Flood: A Must-See Film By Leonardo DiCaprio Explores Climate Change Risks and Solutions

» Follow Leonardo DiCaprio on Facebook


‘Before the Flood’ screening in Melbourne
The Australian-German Climate and Energy College is hosting a viewing of ‘Before the Flood’, with time for discussion following the screening, on Wednesday 2 November at 10.30am-12.15pm at Seminar Room, 700 Swanston St, LAB14, Parkville VIC 3010.

» This is a free event but bookings are essential



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The basic question: what we are going to do about it?

Every two years, the CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology reassess the state of Australia’s climate. The latest report finds an increase in extreme fire weather but also details for the first time the role that humans are playing some extreme weather events.

We encourage you to see this four-minute video about the new report, because at The Sustainable Hour we think this is an excellent four-minute video Peter Hannam and Fairfax Media have produced, (and we wish they had made it shareable in social media…)

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» Sydney Morning Herald – 27 October 2016:
Australia experiencing more extreme fire weather, hotter days as climate changes

“What are we going to do about it?”, Peter Hannam asks at the end. We have interviewed influential leaders from all sides of politics who are concerned about the climate emergency and we asked them that question. See: www.climatesafety.info/radiorelay Their general reply to us was that education of the public is key. This opens up a new question: Why aren’t our two public broadcasters ABC and SBS fully engaged with this educational task?

Why don’t THEY inform about what we are going to do about it?
Why don’t they have bulletins on climate impacts and climate solutions alongside daily weather reports?
Isn’t it part of their charter to inform and educate when there is an emergency? Why don’t they ask the questions which needs to be asked? Why don’t they show us the educational documentaries and how solutions are being rolled out elsewhere in the world which we could be inspired by?

» More here: www.communityrun.org

…and here: www.climatesafety.info/publicbroadcasters

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“DIY is the way to go for our very own personal climate policy – just say to yourself, ‘I’m sick of waiting for other people to do this for me,’ and shut down the export coal and gas industry yourself. Here’s how…”
Annette Schneider








Climate change


AUSTRALIA

State of the Climate 2016: Bureau of Meteorology and CSIRO

The Australian Bureau of Meteorology and CSIRO have released their fourth biennial State of the Climate Report.

» Read more in www.theconversation.com

A good interview with a CSIRO director was conducted on ABC RN, discussing the report. The podcast is available on www.abc.net.au [start at 9:24]


CSIRO BoM State of Climate Report – Costs growing, more action needed

The Climate Institute wrote:

“Today’s State of the Climate report from CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology shows Australia is being put at risk by those who cling to the energy systems of the past, said The Climate Institute today.

“This report shows Australia’s national interest in climate action is clear,” said John Connor CEO of The Climate Institute. “We must manage the risks and grasp the opportunities of increasingly accessible modern, smart and clean technologies that can help avoid growing climate costs.”

“The biggest immediate risk to Australia is quickly becoming those who prefer to cling to the energy systems and politics of the past.”


“It is not rocket science. We need to get carbon emissions down, we need to do it properly, and we need to do it quickly.”
Australian Firefighters Climate Alliance


Some key facts from the biennial State of the Climate Report include:

  • Australia has warmed by around 1°C since 1910.
  • The number of days per year over 35°C has increased in recent decades, except in parts of northern Australia.
  • There has been an increase in extreme fire weather, and a longer fire season, across large parts of Australia.
  • April–October growing season rainfall has reduced by around 11 per cent since the mid-1990s in the continental southeast of Australia.
  • The overwhelming contribution to the additional CO2 in the atmosphere is from human activities, mainly the burning of fossil fuels.
  • The atmospheric CO2 increases in 2015 were the highest ever observed.

In August, The Climate Institute released research on the implications for Australia of the 1.5°C and 2°C warming, goals agreed in the bipartisan backed Paris Agreement. That research showed warming of 1.5°C would see current extreme heat waves, droughts and mass coral bleaching events on the Great Barrier Reef becoming the new normal. At 2°C, our global climate system would move from the upper end of present day climate variability into uncharted territory, resulting in extreme, costly and dangerous impacts for Australia.

“Two days ago the International Energy Agency has released a report, highlighting the global surge in renewable energy capacity transforming global energy systems. On November 4, the Paris Agreement – the framework for global action towards achieving net zero emissions – comes into force after the quickest ratification of any similar international treaty in history.”

“Yet the Australian government is struggling to develop a plan that integrates strong climate action with inclusive economic and social strategies for the inevitable switch to clean energy and a net zero emissions economy.”

“To help avoid the growing human, economic and environmental costs of climate change, Australia should set a credible pathway to net zero emissions before 2050 and have a plan to ensure business, investor and community confidence in clean energy. It also needs to integrate the costs and opportunities of climate change into mainstream decision making.”

“The government’s 2017 review of policies and consideration of post 2030 targets offers an opportunity for the government to look forwards not backwards to the real opportunities and risks of the climate challenge.”

NB Australia’s Joint Standing Committee has been considering the Paris agreement ratification and should put Australia in a position to ratify before or at the Marrakesh convention of the parties (COP) from 7 to 19 November 2016. The Climate Institute’s CEO John Connor will be attending those talks, a pre COP TCI Briefing paper will be out later next week.”



See also the report

» Stockholm Environment Institute:
Implications for Australia of a 1.5 degree future



GLOBAL

The Climate Fallacy of 2100

“We are doing ourselves a dreadful disservice by consistently framing 2100 as essentially the last, final year of impacts. We’re thinking in a blinkered way decades out, while our foot is pressing hard on a warming accelerator that has serious impacts centuries out. 2100 shouldn’t be regarded as a terminal year. To do so is folly, a fallacy in thinking. Life goes on, people do not end there, and seas will not suddenly halt their rise then.”

» 19 October 2016:
Exposed: The Climate Fallacy of 2100
“If we do not plan, now, to limit carbon emissions beyond this century, we will foolishly raise the oceans dramatically for thousands of years.”

» The Independent – 27 October 2016:
Climate change wars are coming and building walls won’t help, top general warns
“The effects of global warming ‘are becoming so severe they hold tremendous conflict potential’ in some areas and the world should prepare for millions of refugees”



“Multiheaded crisis presages collapse”

From Trump to climate change, humanity now faces a multiheaded crisis which presages collapse, wrote George Monbiot in The Guardian:

“National climate change programmes bear no connection to the commitments governments made at Paris. Even if these programmes are fully implemented (they won’t be), they set us on a climate-change trajectory way beyond that envisaged by the agreement. And this is before we know what Trump will do.

One of the many impacts of climate breakdown – aside from such minor matters as the inundation of cities, the loss of food production and curtailment of water supplies – will be the mass movement of people, to an extent that dwarfs current migration. The humanitarian, political and military implications are off the scale.

According to the UN food and agriculture organisation, at current rates of soil loss we have 60 years of harvests left. And the extinction crisis appears, if anything, to be accelerating.”




Renewables


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• Renewables has already overtaken coal as the world’s largest source of power capacity.
• Half a million solar panels are being installed every day now.
• 153 GW of renewables capacity was added in 2015, making a total of 23% of global electricity (coal is at 39%).

Report: One million new jobs waiting for us

“We can create one million new jobs that have a future and are good for our future. Jobs working in clean electricity, water, construction and health. Jobs improving the energy efficiency of buildings, building better public transport and improving our towns and cities,” wrote Australian Conservation Foundation’s CEO Kelly O’Shanassy in a newsletter.

“But if we want these new jobs, we need consistent and reliable policies to address climate change, cut pollution, prepare communities and drive the transition to clean energy. And creating these policies is up to our government.

We’ve just launched our new report, Jobs for a clean energy future, with the Australian Council of Trade Unions (ACTU). Our report models the consequences of our government’s policy choices and the opportunities they can unleash – or block.
Yesterday, ABC Radio interviewed me and Wendy Farmer from Voices of the Valley about this. Wendy knows Hazelwood is about to close – her husband works there.

Together, we called on our government to make a long term plan to guide communities away from coal and help them prepare for good jobs in the future.”

» Download the report (PDF)


Peter Hannam wrote in the Sydney Morning Herald:

“Cutting carbon emissions in line with the Paris climate goals could generate more than one million extra jobs by 2040 as Australia transforms its energy and other sectors provided policy settings are right, a new study has found.

The ‘Jobs in a Clean Energy Future’ report, using modelling by the National Institute of Economic and Industry Research, found the policies needed to reduce 2005 levels of carbon pollution by 80 per cent by 2040 would generate far more jobs than were lost.

The study, funded by the Australian Conservation Foundation and the Australian Council of Trade Unions, estimated the cost across the economy would be $20 billion annually for 20 years. That sum, though, included investments that would have to be spent anyway to replace aging coal-fired power plants.”

» Sydney Morning Herald – 26 October 2016:
Million new jobs in prospect by 2040 even as emissions dive, study finds



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Model: a global 100% renewable electricity system by 2030

A wonderful simulation launched on 3rd November showed how far the rise of renewables can go in principle. A Finnish team modelled a global 100% renewable electricity system for the first time country by country, hour by hour for a whole year. They conclude such a system change is achievable by 2030.

» Read more on www.lut.fi



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Read more

» World Economic Forum – 27 October 2016:
Renewables have overtaken coal — the International Energy Agency says it’s a turning point

» The Guardian – 25 October 2016:
Renewables made up half of net electricity capacity added last year
“Experts hail rapid transformation that will see clean energy outgrow fossil fuels in the next five years – but warn UK is failing to exploit huge potential”

» Bloomberg – 25 October 2016:
Record Green Power Installations Beat Fossil Fuel for First Time
“Renewable energy reached an important turning point last year with record new installations of emissions-free power surpassing sources that burn fossil fuel, according the International Energy Agency.”

» Financial Times – 25 October 2016:
Renewables overtake coal as world’s largest source of power capacity
“About 500,000 solar panels installed every day last year as green electricity surges.”

» The Independent – 26 October 2016:
Sweden on target to run entirely on renewable energy by 2040
“Last year 57 per cent of Sweden’s power came from renewables.”

» Solar Citizens:
The Home-Grown Power Plan




Economy


“A veteran of Britain’s central bank says climate change will have a massive impact on the global financial sector.”


» The Saturday Paper – 29 October 2016:
Veteran UK banker Paul Fisher on climate change and the financial sector

“Economist says green development is the only route to global economic growth and points to China leading the world on climate change action”


» The Guardian – 27 October 2016:
10 years on from the Stern report: a low-carbon future is the ‘only one available’

“The gap between what the scientists tell us we need to do to have any hope of avoiding catastrophic warming and what is politically possible seems to be growing daily. One way of explaining that is by looking at the power of vested interests.”


» The Conversation – 26 October 2016:
Another prime minister, another endorsement for coal – but why?

“Climate change may spark next financial crisis. It is potentially a systemic risk.”
~ Former Bank of England regulator




Petitions


Victoria:
Premier Andrews: Act on Climate, Protect Health – Healthy Futures

Australia:
Time for a national plan to phase out coal – Environment Victoria

Australia:
We call on ABC and SBS to break the silence on the climate emergency – The Sustainable Hour on 94.7 The Pulse

Global:
Be part of the generation that ends oil: Taking Arctic oil to court! – Greenpeace

Global:
Stop all new fossil fuel projects – 350.org


» See more on www.climatesafety.info/petitions



#NoMoreBadInvestments  #NoMoreExcuses  #ClimateEmergency  #ClimateEmergencyDeclaration  #ClimateSolutions 


2 comments

  1. Before the Flood: For fuck sake! What a depressing documentary, that is our earths future IF we don’t change our ways. For someone new to the movement (although always green minded) it’s very overwhelming.

    I can’t recommend watching this enough. But what now? You can be a part of the solution. Eating less beef, growing your own food, invest in renewables, not buying products with Palm oil, public transport and buy local.

    Right now if we cut fossil fuels, the planet would continue to warm slightly but then plateau and begin to shift back to a balanced state. To our Vic leaders – Daniel Andrews, Lily D’ambrosia – we look to you also. ‘I wish the planet well’

    1. There is nothing depressing about this movie. On the contrary, it is great to see the views-counter: the many millions who have now seen this film, and therefore hopefully are getting a clearer picture about that climate change is a civil society problem. It is not something we can lean back and wait for our politicians to miraculously solve for us, as long as we are silent and inactive ourselves.

      For a start, if you’d like to push for the kind of political multi-party solution we need to see implemented, please sign the petition: http://www.climateemergencydeclaration.org/sign

      The film shows things how they are. We have known about all this for many years – no surprises there. If we were to get sad about anything then it is that we – collectively – have allowed self-interest and greed to hijack and stigmatise our political system. But then again, how do we change that? Not by getting depressed or sad – by getting involved, and inviting others to get involved! It’s time to get together and get connected in our communities – and THAT’s something in itself you can get quite excited about, once you take the first steps on that journey!  

      As Gandhi said, Be the change!

      » Benefits from understanding the connection between climate and mental health
      http://climatesafety.info/climate-and-mental-health/

      » The key to unlock the current climate action stalemate
      http://climatesafety.info/climateactionstalemate

      » Get involved
      http://climatesafety.info/getinvolved

Comments are closed.