To care or not to care. That’s the question

Our guests in The Sustainable Hour on 94.7 The Pulse on 26 April 2017 are: Dorthe Pedersen, co-founder of Cycling Without Age, Tim Buckley, industry analyst from Institute of Energy Economics and Financial Analysis, Guy Abrahams, CEO of Climarte and director of the festival ‘Arts+Climate=Change’, and Graeme Stockton, co-organiser of the ‘Forum on Growth and Its Impact’ in Torquay.



Listen to The Sustainable Hour no. 166 on 94.7 The Pulse:

» To open or download this programme in mp3-format, right-click here (Mac: CTRL + click)

  » Subscribe to ‘The Sustainable Hour’ podcast — via iTunes or via your own podcast/RSS software





“If you care about the environment, and you actually care about your grandchildren and your great-grandchildren, what we’re doing now is a path to total ecosystem collapse and disaster.”
Jane Goodall, scientist, Dame of the British Empire

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“We are the bystanders who must choose to intervene or be defined by our failure.”
Lawrence Torcello, Associate Professor of Philosophy at Rochester Institute of Technology in the United States


» The Guardian – 30 April 2017:
Yes, I am a climate alarmist. Global warming is a crime against humanity

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“We no longer care that you “believe in” climate change, because we know that not believing in it means you’re an idiot. Instead, we’re going to demand action actually commensurate with the problem, which is to say the kinds of things in the Merkley-Sanders bill: an end to new fossil-fuel infrastructure. A World War II–scale mobilization for clean energy. Jobs by the millions so that we repair the social fabric even as we’re patching up the planet. Justice for those communities hit first and hit hardest by global warming.”
Bill McKibben

» Mark Hand in ThinkProgress – 23 April 2017:
March for Science demonstrators say the time for action is now, ‘losing is not an option’
“Tens of thousands demonstrated their love for science on Earth Day.” [A six minute read]

“As people who care…”

Billboard 100 metres from environment minister Frydenberg’s office

“We have a federal government that appears intent on slowing climate solutions. They’ve waged war on renewable energy. They want to build new coal power stations. They scrapped Australia’s climate laws and carbon price which were working. And in the meantime, Australia’s climate pollution has gone up on their watch.”
Mark Wakeham, CEO, Environment Victoria


Editorial

By Mik Aidt

This was the week where climate change got very real in our little family, sitting in the lounge room Monday night, watching tv with water running down the white walls from the ceiling. Our house was built a hundred years ago, and its gutters were not constructed to receive such an amount of rain water that came down from the skies that particular evening.

Streets down the hill turned into rivers, and who knows how much damage was done in our city, again – like last year, and the year before. Flash floodings are getting more extreme and they happen more and more frequent. The next morning, gutters and water damage was the topic I talked about with every neighbour that walked by, as I was cleaning out our old gutters in preparation for the next flash of rain. I also talked to our plumber. He told me he had lived here all his life and he had never seen anything like it. As they say: What used to be 100-year-freak-events are becoming regular yearly events.

That’s just one minor, but still very tangible experience with how our weather patterns are changing. Climate change is real, it is happening in front of our eyes, and the thing is: we are not doing enough about stopping what’s causing it – stopping our air pollution, our carbon emissions, our land clearings, population growth, and the entire addiction to growth as the premise for prosperity in our society.

Coal and corruption
In the numerous interviews we have conducted during the latest months in The Sustainable Hour about the proposed construction of Australia’s – and the world’s – biggest coal mine, the Adani megamine in Queensland, we hear that same conclusion again and again: Corruption is allegedly the only way an atrocity such as the Adani coalmine can be explained.

The megamine and the campaign to stop it has been called a ‘tipping point for the nation’.

Two weeks ago we saw the Nationals leader give a full-throated defence of subsidising the mine. Deputy Prime Minister Barnaby Joyce explained in the ABC Radio National that Australians should support it because they are “citizens of the world”, and he warned those that oppose fossil fuels: “If you live with the butterflies, you will die with the butterflies.”

The Australian government’s push for the Adani coal mine and its subsidising of coal mining, even though it is absolutely clear that consumers don’t want coal – not in Australia, not in India – and even though it is a frightening scientific fact that the burning of coal causes climate change, including more ravaging and destructive cyclones such as the one which hit Queensland recently, flash floodings, coral reef destruction, ice melt at the poles, extinction of species, and a long list of other miserable consequences.

When politicians, who depend on their voters if they want to remain in power, decide to put public money into climate-destroying coal mining even though the public in overwhelming majority wants clean energy, it is a clear sign that something smells fishy. Vested interests are controlling the decision-making, and we are not being told the full story about how this has come about.

And why not? What’s wrong with mainstream media? – and the public broadcasters in particular, since they have special duty of care. Why aren’t they giving us the full story?


Lack of understanding
A contributing factor to why humanity’s climate-destructive carbon emissions have been allowed to continue unregulated is a severe failure of media. Journalists have not been – and are still not today – asking the right questions to the politicians. In particular during election periods this has been a critical issue.

During the past decades journalists have failed to understand and communicate what the underlying causes of the climate crisis are – the dirty money transfers and donation activity which has been taking place in the corridors of parliaments have been observed, but barely reported on in the media, and as long as there is no general, public discussion about this and no legal action has been taken to stop it, no changes have been made to the rules. The flawed and corrupt political system has been allowed to continue, regardless of its consequences to the planet, and our future on this planet.

This failure has contributed to the scandalous inaction on air pollution and the increased threats we are all facing today, rich as well as poor.

It is only because of lack of education and understanding in the general population, which is a result of an outrageous media failure, that our politicians are able to get away with their flagrant dishonesty.

The Adani coal scandal crystallises how it was possible the world would end up in this dreadful climate crisis where future generations on this planet will have to deal with dangerous and existential threats fundamentally because of a political choice. Allowing our climate to become unstable, melting the poles and killing millions of people every year, has at its root been a political decision. Not just by Malcolm Turnbull, Barnaby Joice, Trump and the rest of them, but by political leaders through decades of governance.

In The Sustainable Hour today we talk about corruption, again, because there is allegedly no other way to explain why politicians at local, state and federal level are that keen on supporting a coal mine as economically and environmentally insane as the Adani coal mine in Queensland.


Lack of confidence among investors
Climate change was – and is – a political choice. Creating confidence in the market for renewables, begins with politicians putting proper policies in place. Like the new Indian government has managed to do it in only three years, according to Tim Buckley, who we interview in The Sustainable Hour today. And like the New Zealand government has declared it is willing to do.

In The Sustainable Hour today, Tim Buckley reminds us one of the most fundamental mistakes our government has made is its failure to create confidence in an energy market based on renewables – confidence in the market for emissions-free electricity.

Creating a transition to clean energy and a safer climate does not have to be a question of subsidies or anything that represents an expense to the taxpayers. It is first and foremost matter of politicians announcing strong policies and implementing legislation that create confidence among investors and the possibility to plan long-term.

There is a critical lack of insight and education on this topic both among journalists and in the general population: how our politicians have failed us and future generations by not creating that stability and cross-party confidence among investors.

It has not helped the educational situation that we live in a time where young people between the ages of 20 and 35 never read the newspaper or watch television news. They get their news through the social media, where Fake News thrives, and lots of young people end up with some twisted views of how things are connected – which is just how the big energy companies want it to be. They help finance these fake news providers.

There has been a shift from fact to opinion in the political debate around climate change. Don’t take this from me. This is what the former Liberal leader John Hewson has said.

Rather than investing – which means wasting taxpayers’ money on what will soon be useless infrastructure and stranded assets – in new coal and gas, our government should be focusing on making Australian homes more energy efficient and modernise the grid so it is able to cater for a much more diverse and distributed energy generation, where neighbours are able to sell and buy electricity from each other. Energy efficiency will not only help reduce our carbon emissions but also save households money and make our homes more comfortable to live in.

Our federal political leaders, government as well as opposition, have yet to put forward strong, long-term policy and a clear, confident, cross-party vision of our clean energy future.





» Climate Action Tracker’s country assessment for Australia:
‘Inadequate’






 LISTENER SERVICE: 

Content of this hour

Links, excerpts and more information about what we talked about in this Sustainable Hour



Tim Buckley

Interview with Tim Buckley, Australia’s top industrial analyst, about Adani’s coal mine. “It’s ludicrous!” he tells us.

» Full transcript and more info




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Creating that climate where action becomes necessary

“Climate change should not just be something that we see graphs or numbers about. We want it to be one of the things we talk about in the same way as we talk about the road toll, or we talk about the housing crisis. This is something which should be part of our everyday discussion. Getting it into the creative culture of our society is one way we start that happening.”
Guy Abrahams, CEO, Climarte – in The Sustainable Hour

Guy Abrahams

13-minute radio interview with Guy Abrahams about the Arts+Climate=Change festival and the Geelong exhibition.

Read more about Guy Abrahams and about the Geelong exhibition her:

» Centre for Climate Safety – 21 April 2017:
Harnessing the power of the arts for change

» Festival program: see www.artclimatechange.org



ART+CLIMATE=CHANGE exhibition in Geelong

‘Luminous relic’ presents a major collaborative painting and moving image work by Mandy Martin and Alexander Boynes, with a score by Tristen Parr.

The exhibition is on until 9 July 2017. It is complimented by an In conversation event and First Friday lecture.

» Read more on www.geelonggallery.org.au



The smoking chimneys and always burning gas flame at Geelong Refinery

Recently Geelong has seen the city’s refinery run an intensive and expensive advertisement campaign with street banners, placards and radio commercials not to sell any product to consumers, but allegedly in an attempt to maintain or defend the company’s social license and protect status quo.

Read more:

» Centre for Climate Safety:
Refinery’s social license up for public discussion




Climate change is morphing into an existential problem.
The existential problem is morphing into arts.
Arts is morphing into action.


‘Climate change morphing into an existential problem’ with Prof Veerabhadran Ramanathan

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Dorthe Pedersen

» Full transcript

“We need to understand that we are together in this, and I think Cycling Without Age can actually bring that across.”
~ Dorthe Pedersen, co-founder of Cycling Without Age

» Centre for Climate Safety:
The transformative effect of cycling with neighbours across all ages

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‘Forum on Growth and its Impact on Spring Creek

Meeting in Torquay on 29 April 2017

» Facebook event page

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Wonders of a modern virtual grid

“With a virtual grid system, power is always available – either from the grid itself, or from the household battery.

Another benefit is reliability. The software built into solar energy storage systems is able to pre-empt dangerous weather events and set a program that optimizes the system during the storm. These storage systems constantly monitor voltage levels and other information about the grid, millisecond by millisecond, to determine when to switch to battery power in the event of an outage. This switch is often so fast that users aren’t even aware there has been an outage.

The most exciting notion is what could be achieved if every Australian household with solar panels went virtual – in other words, installed a battery and remained connected to the grid. The aggregation of their energy storage systems via the cloud would create by far the largest power plant in Australia – freeing us of the need for billions of dollars’ worth of new investment.

With a virtual solar grid, the investment in supply is already there. Achieving cost-efficient, reliable power doesn’t have to be a huge cost and problem for the individual, the state – or in fact, the nation. We just have to tap into this virtual network with the technology we already have. It sounds simple, and it is.”
Phil Keogan, general Manager of Sunverge Energy Australasia

» One Step Off The Grid – 24 April 2017:
Going virtual – not off grid – the solution to 21st Century power

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https://www.facebook.com/events/238852809914639/

#StopAdani

Even more reasons Adani must be stopped

“The Australian government’s stubborn support of the Carmichael mine is beyond comprehension. It defies logic on so many levels: environmental, political and financial.”
The Climate Institute



» RenewEconomy – 19 April 2017:
Backing new coal power like “defibrillating a corpse”



“Europe’s coal power is disappearing quicker than anyone thought”


» Bloomberg – 19 April 2017:
Europe’s Coal Power Is Going up in Smoke — Fast
“Cheaper fuels make plants obsolete in push for fewer emissions. After centuries of use, coal burning may disappear in a decade”


» The Guardian – 21 April 2017:
Britain set for first coal-free day since Industrial Revolution
“National Grid expects the UK to reach coal energy ‘watershed’ on Friday in what will also be the country’s first 24-hour coal-free period”


“Last year, the average “levelized cost” or total cost of generating power from solar worldwide dropped 17% percent, onshore wind costs dropped 18% and offshore wind turbine power costs fell 28%, according to a new report from the United Nations and Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF).”


» Computerworld – 17 April 2017:
Unsubsidized wind and solar now the cheapest source for new electric power

Wind power competitive with no government subsidies

Danish wind developer Dong Energy won contracts to build two large wind power plants with no government subsidies, a first for the industry.
Rising from the German North Sea, the pair of new wind projects will symbolize the growing competitiveness of offshore wind power, though costs have remained relatively high over the last two years. Dong will collect the revenue from the power generated by the wind plants, and ratepayers in Germany will finance the costs of connecting them to the power grid.

» New York Times – 14 April 2017:
Germany Strikes Offshore Wind Deals, Subsidy Not Included




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» Bloomberg – 19 April 2017:
Clean Energy Isn’t Just the Future — It’s the Present


We’re going electric

Global electricity demand in 2015: 15 terawatts
Predicted solar PV capacity by 2030: 10 terawatts

American experts predict 5-10 terawatts of PV capacity could be in place by 2030 if five challenges can be overcome.

“A terawatt is 1,000 gigawatts. A gigawatt is 1,000 megawatts or one billion watts. So yes, 10 terawatts is a heckuva lot of electricity. It’s not enough to fulfill global demand, which hung around 15 terawatts as of 2015, but wind power and other renewables could fill in the rest.”

The five challenges are:

• A continued reduction in the cost of PV while also improving the performance of solar modules

• A drop in the cost of and time required to expand manufacturing and installation capacity

• A move to more flexible grids that can handle high levels of PV through increased load shifting, energy storage, or transmission

• An increase in demand for electricity by using more for transportation and heating or cooling

• Continued progress in storage for energy generated by solar power

» Source: NREL, the U.S. Department of Energy’s primary national laboratory for renewable energy and energy efficiency research and development – 18 April 2017:
Experts Outline Pathway for Generating Up to Ten Terawatts of Power from Sunlight by 2030

» Paper in Science – 14 April 2017:
‘Terawatt-scale photovoltaics: Trajectories and challenges’

» CleanTechnica – 19 April 2017:
Trump Admin. Outlines Global Solar Plan: 10 Terawatts By 2030

» GreenTechMedia – 19 April 2017:
Pathways to Terrawatts of Solar Power and Gigawatt-Hours of Energy Storage


“There is still a long way to go toward total decarbonisation, but the power sector has picked up huge momentum.”
Markus Hagemann, NewClimate Institute, lead author of the report

Small group of countries triggering global transformation

Triggering a global transformation of our energy systems as required by the Paris Agreement does not take the whole world — it can be started by just a small group of countries, according to a new Climate Action Tracker report.

» Climate Action Tracker – 20 April 2017:
Faster and cleaner 2: It only takes a few countries to kick-start energy system decarbonisation

» Two-page summary of the report
» Infographic summary
» Policy summary
» Technical report



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India leaves fossil fuels behind

» Business Standard – 19 April 2017:
In 10 years, half of India’s energy capacity will be from non-fossil fuel sources
“Non-fossil fuels — renewables, nuclear and large hydroelectric power plants — will account for more than half (56.5 per cent) of India’s installed power capacity by 2027, according to a draft of the third National Electricity Plan (NEP3).”





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New wind farm in Victoria

The Federal government has failed on climate, so state government leadership is now needed. And in Victoria, this is what’s happening.
For instance, the Gellibrand wind farm is now under construction near Birregurra, west of Winchelsea. Geelong Advertiser reports that the $258 million dollar wind farm will be capable of powering 60,000 homes.

The Mt Gellibrand wind farm is due to be completed in July 2018, together with another wind farm under construction near Horsham, and are expected to create about 200 jobs.

The Gellibrand wind farm demonstrates that climate change solutions bring jobs and investment to regional communities.

With the latest science finding alarming warming of the planet, we need to ramp up action on climate change of face impacts such as increasing bushfires, droughts, storms, and heatwaves. In the upcoming budget Premier Daniel Andrews has an opportunity to build on his government’s positive first steps on climate change. So how much will it invest in climate change solutions?

What would you like to see done to prevent climate change from getting worse or build resilience to the impacts that are now locked in?

» Geelong Advertiser – 20 April 2017:
Work starts on Mt Gellibrand wind farm




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“Giving the finger to new generations”

350.org Australia writes:
“Have you seen AGL’s new shiny piece of spin? Our biggest polluter is giving their image a new greenwash to hide the fact that they plan to burn coal until 2050. So we took some liberties with their latest ad and now we need you to send a message to AGL by sharing this video and flooding their new marketing spin with some hard truths. Power for Change is the only campaign taking on Australia’s big polluters.”

» Check out the campaign on www.powerforchange.com.au

» Tweet a message directly to AGL: @AGLEnergy

#PowerforChange #Repower



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‘Our Revolution’ – Bernie Sander’s book from November 2016

“Humanity is at a crossroads. We can continue down the current path of greed, consumerism, oligarchy, poverty, war, racism, and environmental degradation. Or we can lead the world in moving in a very different direction.”
Bernie Sanders, American senator


‘Drawdown’ – new book with a plan to reverse global warming

“Solutions are already in place. We can reverse the buildup of atmospheric carbon within thirty years.”
Paul Hawken, author of ‘Drawdown’


3-4 May 2017:

Solar Energy Exhibition and Conference in Melbourne

» Read more: www.solar.org.au



20 May 2017:

Join Sea Shepherd at Rippleside Beach

Sea Shepherd is running its first ever beach clean in Geelong next month

In response to the drilling in the Great Australian Bight, Sea Shepherd Marine Debris Geelong are holding their first ever beach clean up.
The family friendly event will be held at Rippleside Beach on Saturday, 20 May 2017.

Registration opens at 9:30am at the marquee with a safety briefing to kick off the one-hour beach clean.

Following the beach clean there will also be activities focusing on the “Hands Across The Sand” initiative, standing up to big oil companies that are exploiting the Great Australian Bight. If you’re planning on attending make sure you wear closed toe shoes, a hat and bring along a reusable drink bottle.

» More details via the Facebook event page








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Acknowledgement

We at The Sustainable Hour would like to pay our respect to the traditional custodians of the land on which we are broadcasting, the Wathaurong People, and pay our respect to their elders, past, present and future.

The traditional owners lived in harmony with the environment and with the climate for hundreds of generations. It is not clear – yet – that as European settlers we have demonstrated that we can live in harmony for hundreds of generations, but it is clear that we can learn from the indigenous, traditional owners of this land.

When we talk about the future, it means extending our respect to those children not yet born, the generations of the future – remembering the old saying that…



The decisions currently being made around Australia to ignore climate change are being made by those who won’t be around by the time the worst effects hit home. How utterly disgusting, disrespectful and unfair is that?




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“Participation – that’s what’s gonna save the human race.”
Pete Seeger, American singer




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